Association between initial subjective ratings and overall lens acceptance in daily disposable contact lens wear

Association between initial subjective ratings and overall lens acceptance in daily disposable contact lens wear


José A. Vega OD MSc FAAO
Gary Orsborn OD MSc FAAO FBCLA


Purpose: Patients’ experiences with first attempts at trying contact lenses may influence the overall acceptance of lenses and ultimately the success of new fits. The purpose of this study was to determine if initial subjective patient experiences influence the overall acceptance of daily disposable lenses at the dispensing visit.

Method: This was a randomised, double-masked, crossover, bilateral study. Two daily disposable contact lenses, midafilcon A (MA) and somofilcon A (SA), were dispensed in random order and assessed. Initial subjective ratings were collected using a 0 - 100 visual analog scale.

Results: Fifty-five subjects, aged 18 to 40 (mean ± SD: 26.3 ± 6.3 years), were dispensed lenses. Results of ratings at dispensing were as follows for lens handling (MA: 84.5 ± 16.9, SA 94.7 ± 8.2, p<0.0001); lens removal from blister (MA: 66.8 ± 23.5, SA 92.9 ± 11.1, p<0.0001); comfort (MA: 86.0 ± 15.1, SA 92.8 ± 8.7, p=0.001); vision (MA: 93.1 ± 8.5, SA 95.0 ± 8.6, p=0.19), and overall lens acceptance (MA: 80.4 ± 13.7, SA 93.1 ± 6.6, p<0.0001): Lens handling and overall lens acceptance were moderately correlated for MA (r=0.57, p<0.001,) and weakly correlated for SA (r=0.39, p=0.003). Lens removal from the blister was highly correlated with overall lens acceptance for MA (r=0.74, p<0.001), and moderately correlated for SA (r=0.57, p<0.001). Comfort and overall lens acceptance were moderately correlated for both MA (r=0.62, p<0.001) and SA (r=0.63, p<0.001). Vision and overall lens acceptance were weakly correlated for MA (r=0.39, p=0.004), moderately correlated for SA (r=0.57, p<0.001).

Conclusions: The evaluation of midafilcon A and somofilcon A lenses in this clinical study has demonstrated that initial overall lens acceptance is influenced by lens handling, lens removal from the blister, and comfort. Insights from these results may be useful when considering which lenses to try when fitting new patients.

1st Author Biography: José Vega is Director of Global Clinical Affairs for CooperVision Inc., leading the planning and execution of post-market clinical studies. He received a Doctor of Optometry degree from the New England College of Optometry, USA, Master’s Degree in Vision Science from the University of Waterloo, Canada, and is a PhD candidate, University of Valencia, Spain.

*Data correct at the time of submission to BCLA by NCC.